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Calming Cycle Theory

08/18/2016

Calming cycle theory proposes that early emotional behavior is shaped by autonomic co‐conditioning between mother and infant.

Calming cycle theory proposes that early emotional behavior is shaped by autonomic co‐conditioning between mother and infant.

Martha G. Welch, MD, Director of the Nurture Science Program, published a viewpoint article in Acta Paediatrica that explains Calming Cycle Theory and the role of visceral/autonomic learning in early mother and infant/child behavior and development.

Calming Cycle Theory proposes that early emotional behavior is shaped by visceral/autonomic co-conditioning between mother and infant. Two new constructs, emotional connection and visceral/autonomic co-regulation, are defined within a functional Pavlovian conditioning framework and are theorized to be part of an evolutionarily conserved mammalian phenomenon.

Read the full article.

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